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Biophilia and Research on the Benefits of Indoor Plants

The Global Impact of Biophilic Design in the Workplace

Should a ‘work’ place be any different from the other spaces people inhabit? The relationship between individuals and their environment can be a crucial determinant of how they feel, perform and interact with others. So, designing spaces that inspire, energize and support the people who use them is a global imperative. global-report

People’s connection to nature – biophilia– is an emergent field that can help organizations meet that challenge. This unique study explores the relationship between psychological well-being, work environments and employee expectations on a global scale for the first time.

Read the full article

 

Biophilia and the Benefits of Indoor Plants

The term “biophilia” literally means “love of life or living systems.”

The biophilia hypothesis suggests that there is an instinctive bond between human beings and other living systems. Edward O. Wilson introduced and popularized the hypothesis in his book, Biophilia.

You can learn more about it from:

 

Are Your Design and Furnishing Choices Making People Sick?

An article from published in “Sourceable Industry News & Analysis” by Ruth Newman.

Air Quality is one thing, but lack of exercise and sitting too long also effects the health of office workers.

With over 20 year’s architectural experience, she is the eponymous principal of Ruth Newman Architect. For Ruth, architecture is fulfilling due to its diversity. “Being able to create a space that meets our clients’ requirements – such as designing a home that works today for a couple witho…

Are Your Design and Furnishing Choices Making People Sick?

 

Green Offices Outperform Lean Offices

An article from the Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied by co-author Prof. Haslam.

Read more

 

People, Plants and Productivity

This presentation addresses productivity in workplaces of the future.  Productivity resulting from the benefits of indoor plants.

Presented by Margaret Burchett, Fraser Torpy & Jason Brennan from the Plants and Indoor Environmental Quality Group, Centre for Environmental Sustainability (CEnS), Faculty of Science, University of Technology Sydney (UTS).

View this well prepared presentation.

 

Office Plants Boost Wellbeing

Office plants can assist in boosting staff well-being by up to 47% according to workplace research carried out at this year’s Chelsea Flower Show.  Well-being resulting from the benefits of indoor plants.

This research from the University of Exeter –  further reading.

 

A Plain English Guide: How Plants Really Can Clean Indoor Air

by Margaret Burchett Adj Prof UTS
Plants and Indoor Environmental Quality Group
Centre for Environmental Sustainability,
UTS
November, 2009

The benefits of indoor plants in simple English.
Gain a better understand on how plants can clean the air with this article.

 

Biophilia

The term “biophilia” literally means “love of life or living systems.”

The biophilia hypothesis suggests that there is an instinctive bond between human beings and other living systems. Edward O. Wilson introduced and popularized the hypothesis in his book, Biophilia.

You can learn more about it from:

 

The Psychology of Office Space

by: Knight, C and AS Haslam, 2010.
The relative merits of lean, enriched, and empowered offices: an experimental examination of the impact of workspace management strategies on well-being and productivity.
J. Exptal. Psychol.: Applies 16(2):158-172.
This powerful presentation is based on the study by Knight and Haslam.

Indoor Plants May Improve Worker Productivity and Reduce Stress

by: Virginia I. Lohr, Caroline H. Pearson-Mims, and Georgia K. Goodwin 2)
Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture
Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-6414
This is the article that claims a productivity increase of 12% could be achieved through the benefits of indoor plants.
Access the full article by Lohr, Mims and Goodwin

Ideaction 2008 FM Conference – Presentation by Prof. M Burchett

The benefits on indoor plants and how well adapted are we to our new, urban ecology?

Portrait of Adj Prof Margaret Burchett

Adj Prof Margaret Burchett

The full transcript from Ideaction 2008

Plants in School Classrooms Improve Performance

Live indoor plants in school classrooms may be one way of improving student performance,
according to a recent scientific study conducted by the University of Technology Sydney (UTS).
More about Plants in Schools

Greener is Healthier (UTS Research)

If you work in a basement “dungeon” or a window-tight office and endure headaches, nausea and dizziness —symptoms associated with toxic chemical compounds in indoor air— your local nursery has the solution.
Full article about how plants clean the air.

Sources and Avoidance of Legionnaires Disease

Legionnaires Disease (Legionella)

 

Ten Reasons to Use Indoor Plants

This interesting article on the benefits of indoor plants says it all again.

 

Greening the Great Indoors – Final Report

The University of Technology Sydney carried out a three-year study on how plants clean the air.
Final report by Prof. M. Burchett.

UTS Research Video

Video from UTS (please spend 10 minutes and watch this video, you won’t regret it)

The truth about indoor air quality and how plants really clear the air and calm the mind

Over 80% of Australians live in urban areas, spending 90% of their time indoors at work, school or in the home. Health costs of urban air pollution (UAP) is estimated by CSIRO at about $12 billion per annum, and NSW Health estimates UAP causes up to 2000 deaths each year in the Sydney metropolitan area alone.

Did you know that indoor air pollution is 2-10 times higher than the outdoors or that indoor plants reduce symptoms such as headaches, sore eyes, loss of concentration and feelings of depression? Indoor air is high in CO2 with harmful pollutants emitted from indoor ‘plastic’ or ‘synthetic’ furniture, furnishings and equipment like computers, copiers and solvents.

Professor Margaret Burchett and Dr Fraser Torpy report UTS research findings that prove how efficiently indoor plants can remove pollutants, cleanse stale air and reduce symptoms such as headaches, sore eyes, loss of concentration and feelings of ‘stuffiness’. Discover the health benefits associated with the presences of indoor plants in raising spirits, reducing feelings of stress or fatigue and improving work productivity and performance.

About the speakers

Professor Margaret Burchett is a plant environmental toxicologist, with research interests in the benefits of plants in urban areas – their responses to pollution and their capacities to reduce and remediate pollution. Over the last 15 years she has led research in the UTS Plants and Indoor Environmental Quality Group focusing on the uses of potted-plants to reduce urban indoor air pollution and promote health and wellbeing for building occupants.

Dr Fraser Torpy is a microbial ecologist and biostatistician who has worked alongside Professor Burchett in the UTS Plants and Indoor Environmental Quality Group for over a decade. His primary research interests are the microbial and ecophysiological processes involved with the potted-plant effects on indoor air quality and the analysis of ecological data.

Link to Video

 

UTS Review of “UK Psychological Research on Office Plants”

A recent review by by Margaret Burchett (March, 2012) of a of UK Psychological Research Project.  It details benefits that indoor plants provide to an office environment.

Read review here –  UTS Burchett Review UK Psychological Research Evidence Indoor Plant Wellbeing Benefits.

 

More interesting reading from UTS.